Research of German medieval cookery texts

This is an overview of the culinary research not from a historian‘s point of view but coming from German studies: the research of German cooking recipes research is closely linked with the history of editing.

The first tentative editions of medieval cooking recipe collections were published in the middle of the 19th century. They were part of the initial enthusiasm about editing historical German documents: Willhelm Wackernagel edited select texts of the oldest recipe collection – the book of good food – and published them as An Old German Cook Book. He also edited select recipes from the collection of Meister Hanns. Anton Birlinger published select recipes of some Munich manuscripts. The editions followed the ideas of Karl Lachmann, and consequently the editors changed and manipulated the text collections and even the texts. In this initial phase texts like cooking recipes were considered oddities, that do not really contribute to German Philology but might eventually be interesting for historical purposes.

Before the research of cooking recipe collections was revived in the 1990ies only few editions of recipe collections were published, all of which clearly mirrored the current state of the art of editing German texts. In the 1980ies Trude Ehlert took up the research of medieval cooking recipe texts in Germany with the first detailed philological studies of this genre. It was also her, who edited and published a great number of recipe collections. At the university of Graz the research of medieval culinary documents was taken up in the mid 1990ies: in the beginning we concentrated on background research of medieval culinary history. In the meantime we are mainly working with historical sources (i.e. transcribing and editing) to build a comprehensive base of primary information.

Analyzing the editions that have been published over the years provides a good overview of the continuously broadening research interest in the field commonly called ‘cook book research’. The first attempts were samples of curious recipes that were mainly printed for people interested in medieval culture. In this early phase of German Philology there was great doubt about the benefit in editing such inferior texts, they were not associated with the canon of aesthetic literature. But there was at least some linguistic research on the specialised vocabulary of these texts. At the end of the 19th century the first attempts were made to find matching cultural information in medieval literary texts. In an edition of 1935 the editor first expressed interest in the parallel transmission of cooking recipes. Hans Wiswe, a teacher and historian, is the first to add a comprehensive glossary to his 1956 edition of a Lower German recipe collection, in the years to come he publishes papers discussing select culinary vocabulary and his Kulturgeschichte der Kochkunst (cultural history of cooking) from 1970 includes a Dictionary of Medieval Cookery Terms.

The 1960ies, finally, saw fundamental changes in German Philology and the research of specialised texts was recognised as scholarly work. The publications of Gerhard Eis on medical history and the theory of fachprosa were paving the ground for the research of documents associated with everyday life.

In 1963 Anita Feyl published an edition of a recipe collection that is attributed to a Meister Eberhard of Landshut. The collection as well as the edition itself are remarkable. The collection is not only attributed to an author but it also consists of two parts – the first are of cooking recipes in the German language, the second holds dietetic treatises of food stuff in German and some medical recipes for oils in Latin. In the early days of cook book research the two parts were always regarded separately, the cooking recipes a curious addendum to the dietetic treatise. The edition itself is remarkable because it clearly shows a paradigm change concerning the editing of fachprosa in general and cooking recipes in particular: The dissertation contains at least as many pages dedicated to research as there is edited source text.

After this flare-up of medieval culinary research the following 25 years saw only very little work associated with medieval cookery. There were of course some treatises from historians and a few editions but generally speaking the topic was of very little interest. It was only at the end of the 1980ies that Trude Ehlert of Würzburg University took up this topic again and started what today constitutes culinary research for German medieval heritage.

Trude Ehlert was a driving force in this field. She approached the topic of medieval culinary history with an open mind. She was the first to propagate the close ties of cultural historical research and literary research. Her interest also lies in cultural history, knowledge dissemination in the artes mecanice in general, or the question about oral or written text transmission of cooking recipes in particular. Analysing literary texts beyond the literary boundaries she focuses on social, religious and medical aspects. Ehlert accomplished to tie cook book research into German Philology, even though this topic was not considered fit for scholarly research in the beginning. She impressively showed that this cultural historical topic greatly influences medieval aesthetic literature: Allusions and references can be found throughout all genres – social hierarchies are represented through food in the novella Helmbrecht (Wernher der Gärtner), education, or better, the lack of it are ironically envisioned in Der Ring (Heinrich Wittenwîler), courtly topics are highlighted through feasting and fasting in the courtly novels, and even late minnesong, fed up with love and distress, takes up food topics (Steinmar – Herbstlied, König vom Odenwald).

Ehlert also started a new era of editing medieval culinary heritage. She not only edited some of the most important texts in this field but also started to use this material in class for educational purposes. Over the years her editorial work developed and an analysis of her editions reveals certain parameters that should essentially be associated with modern cook book editions. Most recipe collections have been edited after 1990.

With her enthusiasm Ehlert managed to trigger a broad interest in medieval culinary history which led to a great number of publications since the early 2000s. There are few but high quality general treatises and comparative studies. The spectrum of research interests ranged from editing source texts over linguistic studies of vocabulary or syntax, studies of other sources than literary texts or recipe collections, studies focusing on select time periods or regions, or cultural historical studies focussing on food production, food availability, trade, religious and social constraints, or the roles of household staff.

In Graz, at the Department of German Medieval Studies, we started research on this topic in the mid 90ies and soon incorporated fachprosa and culinary heritage into the curriculum. In the beginning our research concentrated on the core topics of the field and we strongly focussed on acquiring the cultural historic background. Our aim was always to also include a broader European perspective and involve accompanying fields of research like different fields of history, archaeology, or art history or. In our research we try to consider the centuries before and after: Antiquity has a formative influence on medieval alimentation (through dietetics and medicine) and the general rules of alimentation (social, medical) remain in effect for a long into modern times. We also realised the potential of working with and providing source texts, therefore a strong focus lies on editing culinary heritage. The focus here is on sources providing information on cultural historic topics rather than aesthetic texts: recipes, food lists, calendars, house hold notes. Research at our department deals with the study of alimentary vocabulary used in the literary genre, seasoning instructions, dietetics, select food stuff, select dishes, the Middle Eastern influence on European alimentation, as well as the continuous reassessing of medieval culinary history: recent developments included the influence of dietetic concepts or the interplay of climate history and medieval alimentation and tradition. In the last years there have regularly been conferences on food history topics in cooperation with colleagues from Salzburg who focus on baroque food culture.

Very early on in our engagement with medieval culinary history we realised the publicity value of this topic and founded a private society that focuses on medieval alimentation for experimental research and public knowledge dissemination. In our cooking experiments we try to transfer medieval upper class dishes into a modern nouvelle cuisine. We offer cookery courses, and collaborate with local gastronomy. We also communicate our research through public lectures, tasting events or a blog in a national online newspaper.

Our future aims are, of course, the editing of the entire recipe heritage and based on this addressing long overdue the questions of recipe systematics, the parallel transmission of recipes as well as the generating of transmission profiles. This also includes positioning German culinary texts within the scope of European culinary heritage. Some of these aspects can be dealt with in the Coking Recipes of the Middle Ages project or in later projects building on the data produced in this project. In the long run it would be interesting to comprehensively add recipes of Early New Times and other periods as well as other historical languages to our corpus – as this would open a whole range of new perspectives.

Select Bibliography on German cooking recipe research:

  • Adamson, Melitta Weiss. “Vom Arzneibuch zum Kochbuch, vom Kochbuch zum Arzneibuch: Eine diätetische Reise von der arabischen Welt und Byzanz über Italien ins spätmittelalterliche Bayern.” Der Koch ist der bessere Arzt. Zum Verhältnis von historischer Diätetik und Kulinarik im Mittelalter und in der Frühen Neuzeit. Fachtagung im Rahmen des Tages der Geisteswissenschaften 2013 an der Karl-Franzens-Universität Graz, 20.6.-22.6.2013, edited by Andrea Hofmeister-Winter et al., Mediävistik zwischen Forschung, Lehre und Öffentlichkeit. 8. Lang, 2014, pp. 39–62.
  • Birlinger, Anton. “Kalender und Kochbüchlein aus Tegernsee.” Germania, vol. 9, 1864, pp. 192-207.
  • Birlinger, Anton. “Aus dem Tegernseer Kochbüchlein.” Anzeiger für Kunde der deutschen Vorzeit. NF., vol. 12, 1865, pp. 439-40.
  • Birlinger, Anton. “Bruchstücke aus einem alemannischen Büchlein von guter Speise.” Sitzungsberichte der königl. bayer. Akademie der Wissenschaften zu München, vol. 2, 1865, pp. 199-206.
  • Birlinger, Anton. “Ein alemannisches Büchlein von guter Speise.” Sitzungsberichte der königl. bayer. Akademie der Wissenschaften zu München, vol. 2, 1865, pp. 171-99.
  • Birlinger, Anton. “Zur altdeutschen Küchensprache.” Alemannia, vol. 6, 1876, pp. 42-48.
  • Der Koch ist der bessere Arzt. Zum Verhältnis von historischer Diätetik und Kulinarik im Mittelalter und in der Frühen Neuzeit. Fachtagung im Rahmen des Tages der Geisteswissenschaften 2013 an der Karl-Franzens-Universität Graz, 20.6.-22.6.2013. Edited by Andrea Hofmeister-Winter et al., Lang, 2014.
  • Ehlert, Trude. “”Nehmet ein junges Hun, ertrænckets mit Essig”. Zur Syntax spätmittelalterlicher Kochbücher.” Essen und Trinken in Mittelalter und Neuzeit, edited by Irmgard Bitsch et al., Thorbecke, 1987, pp. 261–76.
  • Ehlert, Trude et al. “Das gemeinsame Mahl der König Artus’ Tafelrunde. Menu für König Artus’ Tafelrunde. Rezepte aus spätmittelalterlichen Kochbüchern.” Essen und Trinken in Mittelalter und Neuzeit, edited by Irmgard Bitsch et al., Thorbecke, 1987, pp. 278–98.
  • Ehlert, Trude. “‘Doch so fülle dich nicht satt!’ Gesundheitslehre und Hochzeitsmahl in Wittenwilers “Ring”.” Zeitschrift für deutsche Philologie, vol. 109/1, 1990, pp. 68-85.
  • Ehlert, Trude. “Wissensvermittlung in deutschsprachiger Fachliteratur des Mittelalters oder: Wie kam die Diätetik in die Kochbücher?” Würzburger medizinhistorische Mitteilungen, vol. 8, 1990, pp. 137-59.
  • Ehlert, Trude. “Die (Koch-)Rezepte der Konstanzer Handschrift A I 1. Edition und Kommentar.” ‘Von wyßheit würt der mensch geert.’ Festschrift für Manfred Lemmer zum 65. Geburtstag, edited by Ingrid Kühn & Gotthard Lerchner, Lang, 1993, pp. 39–64.
  • Ehlert, Trude. “Zum Funktionswandel der Gattung Kochbuch in Deutschland.” Kulturthema Essen: Ansichten und Problemfleder, edited by Alois Wierlacher et al., Kulturthema Essen. 1. Akademie, 1993, pp. 319–41.
  • Ehlert, Trude. “Das Buoch von guter spise: kulinarische Bedeutung und kulturhistorischer Wert. Beiheft zur Faksimileausgabe.” Daz buoch von guoter spise, edited by Trude Ehlert und Tupperware Deutschland, 1994.
  • Ehlert, Trude. “Komplexionslehre und Diätetik im ‘Buch Sidrach’.” Licht der Natur. Medizin in Fachliteratur und Dichtung. Festschrift für Gundolf Keil zum 60. Geburtstag, edited by Josef Domes et al., GAG. 585. Kümmerle, 1994, pp. 81–100.
  • Ehlert, Trude. “Das Reichenauer Kochbuch aus der Badischen Landesbibliothek. Edition und Kommentar. Hrsg. in Verbindung mit Patrick Benz, Rick Chamberlin, Diana Finkele, Barbara Gölz, Erwin Heidt, Wolfgang Höhne, Ruth Karasek, Heike Krankel, Birgit Mayer, Eberhard Müller, Annette Roser und Nicole Wolf.” Mediaevistik, vol. 9, 1996, pp. 135-88.
  • Maister hannsen des von wirtenberg koch. Edited by Trude Ehlert, Tupperware, 1996.
  • Ehlert, Trude. “Indikatoren für Mündlichkeit und Schriftlichkeit in der deutschsprachigen Fachliteratur am Beispiel der Kochbuchüberlieferung.” ‘Durch aubenteuer muess man wagen vil.’ Festschrift für Anton Schwob zum 60. Geburtstag, edited by Wernfried Hofmeister & Bernd Steinbauer, Innsbrucker Beiträge zur Kulturwissenschaft. Germanistische Reihe. 57. Universitätsverlag, 1997, pp. 73–85.
  • Ehlert, Trude. “Regionalität und nachbarlicher Einfluß in der deutschen Rezeptliteratur des ausgehenden Mittelalters.” Essen und kulturelle Identität. Europäische Perspektiven, edited by Hans-Jürgen Teuteberg et al., Kulturthema Essen. 2. Akademie-Verlag, 1997, pp. 131–47.
  • Ehlert, Trude. “Zur Bedeutung des rheinfränkischen Kochbuchs in der mittelalterlichen Kochbuchüberlieferung.” Rheinfränkisches Kochbuch um 1445, edited by Thomas Gloning, Tupperware, 1998, pp. 122–34.
  • Münchner Kochbuchhandschriften aus dem 15. Jahrhundert. Cgm 349, 384, 467, 725, 811 und clm 15632. In Zusammenarbeit mit Gunhild Brembs, Marianne Honold, Daniela Körner, Jörn Christoph Krüger, Robert Scheuble, Mirjam Schulz, Christian Suda und Monika Ullrich. Edited by Trude Ehlert, Auer, 1999.
  • Ehlert, Trude. Das Kochbuch des Mittelalters. Albatros, 2000.
  • Ehlert, Trude. “Das Rohe und das Gebackene. Zur sozialisierenden Funktion des Teilens von Nahrung im ‘Yvain’ Chrestiens de Troyes, im ‘Iwein’ Hertmanns von Aue und im ‘Parzival’ Wolframs von Eschenbach.” Mahl und Repräsentation. Der Kult ums Essen. Beiträge des internationalen Symposions in Salzburg. 29. April bis 1. Mai 1999. München: Schöningh 2000, pp.23-40.
  • Ehlert, Trude. “Handschriftliche Vorläufer der ‘Küchenmeisterei’ und ihr Verhältnis zu den Drucken: der Codex S 490 der Zentralbibliothek Solothurn und die Handschrift G.B. 4° 27 des Stadtarchivs Köln.” De consolatione philologiae: Studies in Honor of Evelyn S. Firchow, edited by Anna Grotans et al., GAG. 682/1. Kümmerle, 2000, pp. 41–65.
  • Ehlert, Trude. “Les manuscrits culinaires médiévaux témoignent-ils d’un modèle alimentaire allemand ?” Histoire et identités alimentaires en Europe, edited by Martin Bruegel & Bruno Laurioux, Hachette, 2002, pp. 121–255.
  • Ehlert, Trude, & Rainer Leng. “Frühe Koch- und Pulverrezepte aus der Nürnberger Handschrift GNM 3227a (um 1389).” Medizin in Geschichte, Philologie und Ethnologie. Festschrift für Gundolf Keil, edited by Dominik Groß & Monika Reininger, Königshausen & Neumann, 2003, pp. 289–320.
  • Ehlert, Trude. “Das Kochbuch aus der Stiftsbibliothek Michaelbeuern (Man. cart. 81). Edition und Kommentar. Hrsg. in Zusammenarbeit mit Florian Bambeck, Heike Bezold, Katharina Boll, Martina Fath, Nora Fischer, Michaela Lindner, Markus Nolda, Maria Schaible, Andrea Schartner, Christian Schwaderer und Katrin Wenig.” Würzburger medizinhistorische Mitteilungen, vol. 24, 2005, pp. 121-43.
  • Ehlert, Trude. “Das mittelatlerliche Kochbuch: Von der Handschrift zum Druck.” Kulinarischer Report des dt. Buchhandels 2005-2006, edited by Gebrüder Kornmayer, Imselbst-Verlag, 2005, pp. 121–34.
  • Ehlert, Trude. “Zur Semantisierung von Essen und Trinken in Wernhers des Gertnaere ‘Helmbrecht’.” Zeitschrift für deutsches Altertum, vol. 138.1, 2009, pp. 2-16.
  • Küchenmeisterei. Edition, Übersetzung und Kommentar zweier Kochbuch-Handschriften des 15. Jahrhunderts. Solothurn S 490 und Köln, Historisches Archiv GB 4° 27. Mit einem reprographischen Nachdruck der Kölner Handschrift. Edited by Trude Ehlert, Lang, 2010.
  • Eis, Gerhard. “Mittelalterliche Fachprosa der Artes.” Deutsche Philologie im Aufriß, edited by Wolfgang Stammler, Schmidt, 1960, pp. Sp. 1103–1216.
  • Feyl, Anita. “Das Kochbuch Meister Eberhards. Ein Beitrag zur altdeutschen Fachliteratur.” Dissertation, Albert-Ludwigs-Universität, 1963.
  • Guggi, Natascha. “ain weizz gemùess oder ain weizz chost mach also … Dynamische Edition des Kochbuchs der Handschrift Cgm 415. Mit Glossar und Rezeptregister. Dissertation, Karl-Franzens-Universität, 2013.
  • Hepp, Eva. “Die Fachsprache der mittelalterlichen Küche. Ein Lexikon.” Kulturgeschichte der Kochkunst. Kochbücher und Rezepte aus zwei Jahrtausenden. Mit einem lexikalischen Anhang zur Fachsprache, edited by Hans Wiswe, Moos, 1970, pp. 185–224.
  • Hofmeister-Winter, Andrea (2014), ‘”und iz als ein latwergen.” Quellenstudie zu Vorkommen, Zusammensetzung und diätetischen Wirkzuschreibungen von Latwerge in älteren deutschsprachigen Kochrezepttexten’, in Der Koch ist der bessere Arzt. Frankfurt am Main [u.a.]: Lang), 223-52.
  • Klug, Helmut W. (2014), ‘„… und färbs ain wenig ob du wilt.“ Eine analytische Bestandsaufnahme der diätetischen Aspekte des Färbens von Speisen in der spätmittelalterlichen Küche’, in Der Koch ist der bessere Arzt. Frankfurt am Main [u.a.]: Lang), 205-22.
  • Klug, Helmut W. “Romanisches in den Kochrezepttexten des Mittelalters.” Linguistica culinaria. Festgabe für Heinz-Dieter Pohl zum 70. Geburtstag, edited by Hubert Bergmann & Regina M. Unterguggenberger, praesens, 2012, pp. 253–69.
  • Klug, Helmut W. “Mittelalterliche Kulinarik: ein schlaglichtartiger Aufriss einer fremden Kultur.” “Man nehme.” – Kochbücher und ihre Rezeption im Laufe der Jahrhunderte. Beiträge zum Symposium “Man nehme.”, edited by Steiermärkische Landesbibliothek, Steirischer Verlag, 2016, pp. 33–103.
  • Klug, Helmut W., & Karin Kranich. “Das Edieren von handschriftlichen Kochrezepttexten am Weg ins digitale Zeitalter. Zur Neuedition des Tegernseer Wirtschaftsbuches.” Vom Nutzen der Editionen. Zur Bedeutung moderner Editorik für die Erforschung von Literatur- und Kulturgeschichte, edited by Thomas Bein, Beihefte zu editio. 39. De Gruyter, 2015, pp. 121–37.
  • Klug, Helmut W., & Karin Kranich. “Ursprung und Grundlagen der mittelalterlichen Temperamente-Medizin.” “Man nehme.” Kochbücher und ihre Rezeption im Laufe der Jahrhunderte. Beiträge zum Symposium “Man nehme.” 2015, Veröffentlichungen der Steiermärkischen Landesbibliothek. 40. Steiermärkische Landesbibliothek, 2016, pp. 137–70.
  • Kochbuchforschung interdisziplinär: Beiträge der kulinarhistorischen Fachtagungen in Melk 2015 und Seckau 2016. Unipress Graz Verlag GmbH, 2017.
  • Kranich-Hofbauer, Karin (2011), ‘»Wie mann ein hecht inn limonij macht« Zitrusfrüchte in frühen Kochrezepten als Spiegel des Kulturtransfers’, in Die Frucht der Verheißung. Zitrusfrüchte in Kunst und Kultur, 374-286.
  • Kranich, Karin. “Das Tegernseer Wirtschaftsbuch: Benediktinische Kulinarik in Fasten- und Nichtfastenzeiten.” Der Koch ist der bessere Arzt. Zum Verhältnis von historischer Diätetik und Kulinarik im Mittelalter und in der Frühen Neuzeit. Fachtagung im Rahmen des Tages der Geisteswissenschaften 2013 an der Karl-Franzens-Universität Graz, 20.6.-22.6.2013, edited by Andrea Hofmeister-Winter et al., Mediävistik zwischen Forschung, Lehre und Öffentlichkeit. 8. Lang, 2014, pp. 177–88.
  • Wiswe, Hans. “Ein mittelniederdeutsches Kochbuch des 15. Jahrhunderts.” Braunschweigisches Jahrbuch, vol. 37, 1956, pp. 19-55.
  • Wiswe, Hans. “Nachlese zum ältesten mittelniederdeutschen Kochbuch.” Braunschweigisches Jahrbuch, vol. 39, 1958, pp. 103-21.
  • Wiswe, Hans. Kulturgeschichte der Kochkunst. Kochbücher und Rezepte aus zwei Jahrtausenden. Moos, 1970.
  • Wackernagel, Wilhelm. “Altdeutsches Kochbuch. Diz ist ein guot lere von guoter spise.” Zeitschrift für deutsches Alterthum, vol. 5, 1845, pp. 11-16.
  • Wackernagel, Wilhelm. “Kochbuch von maister Hannsen des von Wirtenberg koch.” Zeitschrift für deutsches Altertum, vol. 9, 1853, pp. 365-73.
  • Zeppezauer, Katherina (2017): Nahrhafte Dichtung. Exemplarische Analysen zur Poetisierung des deutschsprachigen mittelalterlichen Begriffsfeldes ‚Speise‘. Graz, Diss.

Chronological list of German cooking recipe editions (with reference to the CoReMA sigla of the German Cooking recipes in square brackets.):

  • Birlinger, Anton: Bruchstücke aus einem alemannischen Büchlein von guter Speise. In: Sitzungsberichte der königlich bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften zu München 2 (1865), S. 199-206. [N1]
  • [Schmeller, Andreas]: Ein Buch von guter Speise. Stuttgart: Literarischer Verein 1844. [M11]
  • Wackernagel, Wilhelm: Altdeutsches Kochbuch. Diz ist ein guot lere von guoter spise. In: Zeitschrift für deutsches Alterthum 5 (1845), S. 11-16. [M11]
  • Wackernagel, Wilhelm: Kochbuch von maister Hannsen des von Wirtenberg koch. In: Zeitschrift für deutsches Alterthum 9 (1853), S. 365-73. [Bs1]
  • Voigt, Johann: Aus einem handschriftlichen Kochbuch des XV. Jahrhunderts. In: Anzeiger für Kunde der deutschen Vorzeit. NF. 4 (1857), S. 81-83. [B6]
  • Birlinger, Anton: Kalender und Kochbüchlein aus Tegernsee. In: Germania 9 (1864), S. 192-207. [M13]
  • Birlinger, Anton: Aus dem Tegernseer Kochbüchlein. In: Anzeiger für Kunde der deutschen Vorzeit. NF. 12 (1865), S. 439-40. [M13]
  • Mittelalterliches Hausbuch. Bilderhandschrift des 15. Jahrhunderts. Mit einem Vorwort von August von Essenwein. Nachdruck der Ausgabe Frankfurt 1887. Hildesheim, Zürich, New York: Georg Olms 1986. [Wol1]
  • Birlinger, Anton: Ein alemannisches Büchlein von guter Speise. In: Sitzungsberichte der königlich bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften zu München 2 (1865), S. 171-99. [M2]
  • Gollub, Hermann: Aus der Küche der deutschen Ordensritter. In: Prussia 31 (1935), S. 118-24. [B6]
  • Wiswe, Hans: Ein mittelniederdeutsches Kochbuch des 15. Jahrhunderts. In: Braunschweigisches Jahrbuch 37 (1956), S. 19-55. [Wo5]
  • Daz buoch von guoter spise. Aus der Würzburg-Münchener Handschrift neu herausgegeben. Hrsg. v. Hans Hajek. Berlin: Schmidt 1958. (=Texte des späten Mittelalters. 8.) [M11]
  • Feyl, Anita: Das Kochbuch Meister Eberhards. Ein Beitrag zur altdeutschen Fachliteratur. Freiburg im Breisgau: Univ., Diss., 1963. [A1]
  • Ein Stockholmer mittelniederdeutsches Arzneibuch aus der zweiten Hälfte des 15. Jahrhunderts. Hrsg. v. Agi Lindgren. Stockholm: Almqvist & Wiksell 1967. (=Acta Universitatis Stockholmiensis. Stockholmer Germanistische Forschungen. 5.) [St1]
  • Danner, Berthilde: Alte Kochrezepte aus dem bayrischen Inntal. In: Ostbairische Grenzmarken. Passauer Jahrbuch für Geschichte, Kunst und Volkskunde 12 (1970), S. 118-28. [Ka2]
  • Ehlert, Trude: Die (Koch-)Rezepte der Konstanzer Handschrift A I 1. Edition und Kommentar. In: ‘Von wyßheit würt der mensch geert.’ Festschrift für Manfred Lemmer zum 65. Geburtstag. Hrsg. v. Ingrid Kühn; Gotthard Lerchner. Frankfurt am Main: Lang 1993, S. 39-64. [Ko1]
  • Ehlert, Trude: Das Reichenauer Kochbuch aus der Badischen Landesbibliothek. Edition und Kommentar. Hrsg. in Verbindung mit Patrick Benz, Rick Chamberlin, Diana Finkele, Barbara Gölz, Erwin Heidt, Wolfgang Höhne, Ruth Karasek, Heike Krankel, Birgit Mayer, Eberhard Müller, Annette Roser und Nicole Wolf. In: Mediaevistik 9 (1996), S. 135-88. [Ka1]
  • Adamson, Melitta Weiss: Die Kochrezepte im Codex J. [sic!] 5 (no. 125) der Bibliothek des Priesterseminars Brixen. Edition und Kommentar. In: Würzburger medizinhistorische Mitteilungen 14 (1996), S. 291-303. [Br1]
  • Maister hannsen des von wirtenberg koch. Hrsg. v. Trude Ehlert. Mit Transkription, Übers., Glossar und kulturhist. Kommentar. Frankfurt am Main: Tupperware 1996. [Bs1]
  • Das mittelalterliche Hausbuch. Kommentarband. Hrsg. v. Christoph Graf zu Waldburg Wolfegg. München, New York: Prestel 1997. [Wol1]
  • Schulz, Mirjam: Die Kochrezepte des cpg 583, fol. 80r-89r: Edition und Untersuchung eines spätmittelalterlichen Fachliteraturtextes. Würzburg: Univ., Magisterarbeit., 1998. [H3]
  • Rheinfränkisches Kochbuch um 1445. Hrsg. v. Thomas Gloning. Mit einer kulturhistorischen Würdigung von Trude Ehlert, Übers., Anm. und Glossar. Frankfurt am Main: Tupperware 1998. [B1]
  • Aichholzer, Doris: “Wildu machen ayn guet essen.” Drei mittelhochdeutsche Kochbücher: Ersteditionen, Übersetzung, Kommentar. Wien [u.a.]: Lang 1999. (=Wiener Arbeiten zur germanischen Altertumskunde und Philologie. 35.) [W1, W3, W4]
  • Münchner Kochbuchhandschriften aus dem 15. Jahrhundert. Cgm 349, 384, 467, 725, 811 und clm 15632. In Zusammenarbeit mit Gunhild Brembs, Marianne Honold, Daniela Körner, Jörn Christoph Krüger, Robert Scheuble, Mirjam Schulz, Christian Suda und Monika Ullrich. Hrsg. v. Trude Ehlert. Im Auftrag von Tupperware Deutschland. Donauwörth: Auer 1999. [M1, M2, M4, M5, M7, M10]
  • Daz buoch von guoter spise. The book of good food. A study, edition, and English translation of the oldest German cookbook. Hrsg. v. Melitta Weiss Adamson. Krems: Medium Aevum Quotidianum 2000. (=Medium Aevum Quotidianum Sonderband. 9.) [Ds1, M11]
  • Honold, Marianne: Die Kochrezepte des Cod. Guelf. 16.17. Aug. 4°, Bl. 102r-118v. In: Würzburger medizinhistorische Mitteilungen 19 (2000), S. 177-208. [Wo2]
  • Goldene Speisen in den Maien. Das Kochbuch des Augsburger Zunftbürgermeisters Ulrich Schwarz († 1478). Hrsg. v. Gerhard Fouquet. Unter Mitarb. von Oliver Becker [u.a.]. St. Katharinen: Scripta-Mercaturae-Verl. 2000. (=Sachüberlieferung und Geschichte. 30.) [Wo4]
  • Sorbello Staub, Alessandra: Die Basler Rezeptsammlung. Studien zu spätmittelalterlichen deutschen Kochbüchern. Erstausgabe mit Kommentar und Fachglossar der Handschriften Basel, ÖUB D II 30, Bl. 300ra-310va, und Heidelberg, UB cpg 551, Bl. 186r-196v und 197r-204r. Würzburg: Königshausen & Neumann 2002. (=Würzburger medizinhistorische Forschungen. 71.) [Bs2, H2]
  • Ehlert, Trude; Rainer Leng: Frühe Koch- und Pulverrezepte aus der Nürnberger Handschrift GNM 3227a (um 1389). In: Medizin in Geschichte, Philologie und Ethnologie. Festschrift für Gundolf Keil. Hrsg. v. Dominik Groß u. Monika Reininger. Würzburg: Königshausen & Neumann 2003, S. 289-320. [N2]
  • Ehlert, Trude: Das Kochbuch aus der Stiftsbibliothek Michaelbeuern (Man. cart. 81). Edition und Kommentar. Hrsg. in Zusammenarbeit mit Florian Bambeck, Heike Bezold, Katharina Boll, Martina Fath, Nora Fischer, Michaela Lindner, Markus Nolda, Maria Schaible, Andrea Schartner, Christian Schwaderer und Katrin Wenig. In: Würzburger medizinhistorische Mitteilungen 24 (2005), S. 121-43. [Mi1]
  • Caparrini, Marialuisa: La letteratura culinaria in bassotedesco medio: un’indagine linguistica e storico-culturale sulla base del ricettario di Wolfenbüttel (Cod. Guelf. Helmst. 1213). Kümmerle 2006. (=Göppinger Arbeiten zur Germanistik. 732.) [Wo5]
  • M I 128: Medizinische-naturwissenschaftliche Sammelhandschrift (Kochbuch von fol. 318r-331v und 337r-337v). Hrsg. v. Beatrix Koll. Zuletzt geändert 2009. Url: http://www.ubs.sbg.ac.at/ sosa/lucull/lucull128.htm [21.12.2013]. [Sb2]
  • Küchenmeisterei. Edition, Übersetzung und Kommentar zweier Kochbuch-Handschriften des 15. Jahrhunderts. Solothurn S 490 und Köln, Historisches Archiv GB 4° 27. Mit einem reprographischen Nachdruck der Kölner Handschrift. Hrsg. v. Trude Ehlert. Frankfurt am Main [u.a.]: Lang 2010. (=Kultur, Wissenschaft, Literatur – Beiträge zur Mittelalterforschung. 21.) [K1, So1]
  • Guggi, Natascha: “ain weizz gemùess oder ain weizz chost mach also:” Dynamische Edition des Kochbuchs der Handschrift 415. Mit Glossar und Rezeptregister. Graz: Univ., Masterarb., 2013. [M3]
  • Friedl, Verena: ‘daz púch von den chósten. Dynamische Edition des deutschen Jamboninus von Cremona nach Cgm 415., Masterarb. (Karl-Franzens-Universität) 2013. [M3]
  • Ehlert, Trude. “Kochrezepte und Notizen aus dem Günterstaler Notizenbuch. Edition von fol. 11r–14v der Handschrift GLA 65 Nr. 247 aus dem Generallandesarchiv Karlsruhe.” Der Koch ist der bessere Arzt. Zum Verhältnis von historischer Diätetik und Kulinarik im Mittelalter und in der Frühen Neuzeit. Fachtagung im Rahmen des Tages der Geisteswissenschaften 2013 an der Karl-Franzens-Universität Graz, 20.6.-22.6.2013, edited by Andrea Hofmeister-Winter et al., Mediävistik zwischen Forschung, Lehre und Öffentlichkeit. 8. Lang, 2014, pp. 287–314. [Ka3]
  • Ehmann, Jürgen: ‘Die Kochrezepttextsammlung des Berliner Codex mgq 1187. Dynamisch-mehrschichtige Edition mit Kommentar und Rezeptregister’, Masterarb. (Karl-Franzens-Universität) 2016. [B4]
  • „… und versalz es nicht!”: Die älteste Kochrezeptesammlung Salzburgs aus einer spätmittelalterlichen Handschrift der Universitätsbibliothek Salzburg. Edited by Beatrix Koll, Mandelbaum Verlag, 2016. [Sb1]
  • Galka, Selina: Mehrschichtig-dynamische Edition der Erlangener Kochrezepttextsammlung in Ms. B 37. Mit textkritischem Kommentar und Ausgabenglossar. Masterarbeit, Graz, 2019. [Er2]
  • Die Neuedition der Handschrift München, Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, cgm 8137. Hrsg. v. Karin Kranich und Helmut W. Klug. Unter Mitarbeit des Vereins KuliMa – Kulinarisches Mittelalter an der Universität Graz. [Online-Edition in Vorbereitung]. [M13]

 

Creative Commons Lizenzvertrag
These contents were presented at the IEHCA Conference 2018 and are licensed under the Creative Commons Namensnennung 4.0 International Lizenz.
Helmut W. Klug


You may also like...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Search OpenEdition Search

You will be redirected to OpenEdition Search